Last edited by Meztishakar
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

8 edition of The Lollards found in the catalog.

The Lollards

by Richard Rex

  • 11 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by Palgrave Macmillan .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Blasphemy, heresy, apostasy,
  • British & Irish history: c 1000 to c 1500,
  • History of religion,
  • Social history,
  • Theology,
  • c 1000 CE to c 1500,
  • History,
  • History - General History,
  • History: World,
  • England,
  • Christianity - Protestant,
  • General,
  • History / General,
  • Religion-Christianity - Protestanism,
  • Lollards

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages206
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9862573M
    ISBN 100333597516
    ISBN 109780333597514

    The evidence given us by John Foxe in his Book of Martyrs provides more information about the social and theological standing of Lollards than we know about many later religious dissidents. Recent work has added to our knowledge. Geoffrey Dickens and Claire Cross have reconsidered the place of the Lollards in the development of the English Reformation, especially in Cited by: 6. The Lollards were followers of John Wycliffe, the Oxford University theologian and Christian Reformer who translated the Bible into vernacular English. The Lollards had .

    The Twelve Conclusions of the Lollards is a Middle English religious text document containing statements by followers of the English medieval sect, the Lollards, followers of John Wycliffe. [1] The Conclusions were written in [2] The text document was presented to the Parliament of England and nailed to the doors of Westminster Abbey and St Paul's Cathedral as a placard (usual medieval. Everybody counts. Even the Lollards. A counting book that retells Jesus’ parables and a Reformation-themed alphabet book are among my favorite new children’s books.

    Tudor Lollards. It has been argued that the Lollards that survived these purges embraced the ideas of Martin Luther. This included William Tyndale who worked for many years in completing the English translation of the English Bible that had been started by John Wycliffe and the Lollards. (19) This was a very dangerous activity for ever since. Question: "Who were the Lollards?" Answer: The term Lollard is a pejorative from the Middle Dutch lollaert, which meant “mumbler.”The term was used to refer to someone who had pious but heretical beliefs. It came to be applied to the followers of John Wycliffe (–). Wycliffe was an Oxford theologian who questioned the authority of the Pope and emphasized the authority of Scripture.


Share this book
You might also like
Heroes and villains

Heroes and villains

After Hannibal

After Hannibal

Experiments In College Physics

Experiments In College Physics

Pheasants in North America.

Pheasants in North America.

Tender data

Tender data

How dogs really work!

How dogs really work!

Prints from the Guggenheim Museum collection

Prints from the Guggenheim Museum collection

Champion Level 2 Cassette Program

Champion Level 2 Cassette Program

The dwellers on the Nile

The dwellers on the Nile

On the uses of military power in the nuclear age

On the uses of military power in the nuclear age

Building Successful Research Partnerships, August 2001

Building Successful Research Partnerships, August 2001

Mean-flow and turbulence measurements in the vicinity of the trailing edge of an NACA 63-012 airfoil

Mean-flow and turbulence measurements in the vicinity of the trailing edge of an NACA 63-012 airfoil

roles of magistrates

roles of magistrates

Minutes of the ... annual session of the Little Kehukee Primitive Baptist Association ...

Minutes of the ... annual session of the Little Kehukee Primitive Baptist Association ...

Jacobite cess roll for the county of Arbedeen in 1715, from the MS of John Forbes of Upper Boyndlie, now in the possession of J.C.M. Ogilvie-Forbes of Boyndlie.

Jacobite cess roll for the county of Arbedeen in 1715, from the MS of John Forbes of Upper Boyndlie, now in the possession of J.C.M. Ogilvie-Forbes of Boyndlie.

The Lollards by Richard Rex Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Lollards offers a brief but insightful guide to the entire history of England's only native medieval heretical movement.

Beginning with its fourteenth century origins in the theology of the Oxford professor, John Wyclif, Richard Rex examines the spread of Lollardy across much of England until its eventual dissolution amidst the ecclesiastical and doctrinal upheavals of the sixteenth century/5(3).

The Lollards offers a brief, insightful guide to the entire history of England's only native medieval heretical movement. Beginning with its fourteenth century origins in the theology The Lollards book an Oxford professor, John Wyclif, Richard Rex examines the spread of Lollardy across much of England until its eventual dissolution amidst the ecclesiastical and doctrinal upheavals of the3/5.

The Lollards offers a brief, insightful guide to the entire history of England's only native medieval heretical movement. Beginning with its fourteenth century origins in. "The Lollards offers a brief but insightful guide to the entire history of England's only native medieval heretical movement.

Beginning with its fourteenth-century origins in the theology of the Oxford professor, John Wycliff, Richard Rex examines the spread of Lollardy across much of England until its eventual dissolution amidst the ecclesiastical and doctrinal upheavals of the sixteenth century.".

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

The Lollards offers a brief but insightful guide to the entire history of England's only native medieval heretical movement. Beginning with its fourteenth century origins in the theology of the Oxford professor, John Wyclif, Richard Rex examines the spread of Lollardy across much of England until its eventual dissolution amidst the ecclesiastical and doctrinal upheavals of the sixteenth century.

One of the great accomplishments of the Lollards was their translation of the first English Bible. Although this first English Bible is popularly credited today to Wycliffe himself, the actual translating was done by his disciples and friends.

Wycliffe giving his translation of the Bible to his Lollard followers. In many ways this "is" the real history of the movement spawned by the church of the Book of Acts and it is these movements that survived and immense persecution and with no real money or resources were forced to Live the faith they professed vs.

much of the come and go Laodician church today and from which our study will seek to surround (hence the term Lollard). The movement led by Wycliffe was known as the “Lollards,” a pejorative term derived from the Latin lolium, which meant “a wild weed or vetch (often translated as ‘tares’) which can choke out wheat, as in the parable from Matthew ”.

The Lollards were responsible for a translation of the Bible into English, by Nicholas of Hereford, and later revised by Wycliffe’s secretary, John Purvey. This article was most recently revised and updated by Jeff Wallenfeldt, Manager, Geography and History.

Learn More in these related Britannica articles. The Twelve Conclusions of the Lollards is a Middle English religious text containing statements by leaders of the English medieval movement, the Lollards, inspired by teachings of John Wycliffe. The Conclusions were written in The text was presented to the Parliament of England and nailed to the doors of Westminster Abbey and St Paul's Cathedral as a placard.

The manifesto suggested the. The Lollards who followed Wyclif derived their name from the medieval Dutch words meaning 'to mutter' (probably reflecting their style of worship, which was based on reading the scriptures).

Lollardy has been called 'England's first heresy'. It was never an organized movement in the sense of a modern religious or secular organization. There was no 'Head Lollard' or organizational hierarchy of Lollards. Rather, Lollards were simply people tied together by a set of beliefs.

Those beliefs. The Lollards offers a brief but insightful guide to the entire history of England's only native medieval heretical movement. Beginning with its fourteenth century origins in the theology of the Oxford professor, John Wyclif, Richard Rex examines the spread of Lollardy across much of England until its eventual dissolution amidst the ecclesiastical and doctrinal upheavals of the sixteenth : Macmillan Education UK.

The Lollards and Wyclif denied many of the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church which undermined the authority of the Scriptures and the gospel of Christ and his twelve Apostles.

For the first time in English history, an appeal was made “to the people, not the scholars.”. Internet Archive BookReader Wycliffe and the Lollards. The Lollards By Kirkland & Hassell In Germany - and later, in England - many of the Waldenses were called "Lollards," as some suppose, after the celebrated Walter Lollard, of Germany, who exercised his ministry in the early part of the fourteenth think the name "Lollard" was derived from "lolium" (a tare), as if the Lollards were tares in the kingdom of Christ.

The Lollards: A Tale, Founded on the Persecutions Which Marked the Early Part of the Fifteenth Century; Vol. by Thomas Gaspey. Starting at $Price Range: $ - $ The Lollards were followers of Wycliffe, at first composed of Wycliffe's supporters at Oxford and the royal court, but soon the movement spread and became a strong popular movement.

It was blamed (perhaps unfairly) for some of the anticlerical aspects of the Peasant's Revolt. texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK The Lollard Bible and other medieval Biblical versions by Deanesly, Margaret.

Publication date Topics Bible, Bible, Bible, Lollards Publisher Cambridge University Press Collection robarts; toronto Digitizing sponsor MSN Contributor Robarts - University of Pages:. item 3 Lollards by Thomas Gaspey (English) Hardcover Book Free Shipping! - Lollards by Thomas Gaspey (English) Hardcover Book Free Shipping!

$ Free shipping. No ratings or reviews yet. Be the first to write a review. Best Selling in Nonfiction. See all.‘Although the book spans a period from the Lollards to New Labour, Rose primarily examines the autodidact tradition from around the time of the Reform Bill up to the end of the Second World War.’ ‘An enormously bloated religious class straddles society, attempting to throttle its own internal opposition, the Lollards.’.LOLLARDS.

Lollards is the name given to the English followers of John wyclif, the Oxford theologian and heretic who died in A derogatory term, it was meant to convey the attributes of a lollaerd (in Middle Dutch, a mumbler) and a loller (in Middle English, an idler).

At first the sect was confined to a small group of educated priests, such as Nicholas hereford, Philip repington, and John.